Viewing entries tagged
Autodesk Inventor

Automated feed, turning, threading

Automated feed, turning, threading

This post is a continuation of our previous post: http://www.leanmachinecnc.com/news/2016/12/27/lathe-machining-cost-reduction

Whenever possible, we program our parts on several different machines so they can all be run simultaneously to shorten overall cycle times and give us redundancy of resources.

With our Okuma dual spindle lathe and Autodesk HSM we are able to automate parts that have several operations.  The programming and setup time are intense but the result is a part that can run in a fraction of the time with very little human interaction.  In this example, we took a part that required several hours of total human attention to a 45 minute unmanned operation.

Here is the Inventor drawing of the part.  It's a small brass adapter with different threads on either end.

Moving from CAD to CAM seamlessly is the key to our engineering process.  If we change a size in the 3D model the tool path will automatically update.  Below is a screenshot of the HSM programming for this part.

Like our previous gang-tool setup this turning strategy uses Iscar's latest technology Pentacut.

The Iscar pentacut uses a 5 sided insert.  The insert is a strong design put into a rigid holder and has a chip forming profile which makes for accurate parts and a great finish.

The Iscar pentacut uses a 5 sided insert.  The insert is a strong design put into a rigid holder and has a chip forming profile which makes for accurate parts and a great finish.

The video below is a run through of the cycle.  What the video doesn't show is that the main spindle will bar feed the secondary spindle so we can run a longer bar without interruption.

Below is the finished part ready to ship!

Autodesk HSM and Compound Miter Machining

Autodesk HSM and Compound Miter Machining

The topic of the post is two-fold: one, we need to introduce Lean Machine's integration of Autodesk's HSM programming for all of our mills and lathes; second, we want to show a really cool compound miter cut on the end of a steel tube.  Below is a CAD model from Autodesk Inventor.  The really neat thing about HSM is that it allows us to program directly inside of Inventor so there is no need to have a translation file in between CAM (Computer Aided Machining), or a separate CAM program.

The steel tube that we are going to cut has been changed to semi-transparent for illustration purposes.

The steel tube that we are going to cut has been changed to semi-transparent for illustration purposes.

Doing a compound cut would normally require a 4 or 5 axis milling machine.  Instead, we created angled and twisted jaws for our vises.

Here is the finished tube mounted in the vise to show how it turns it on the exact angle so the operation can be completed from just one top cutting plane.

Here is the finished tube mounted in the vise to show how it turns it on the exact angle so the operation can be completed from just one top cutting plane.

This is the top view of the set-up. Note the marking lines on the back jaw to make sure they go back in the machine correctly.  The same marks are in the CAD model, so everything matches when the machinist sets up the job.

This is the top view of the set-up. Note the marking lines on the back jaw to make sure they go back in the machine correctly.  The same marks are in the CAD model, so everything matches when the machinist sets up the job.

This is the top view of the clean precise cut that the mill provides.

This is the top view of the clean precise cut that the mill provides.

These are the front and back vise jaws removed from the vise; they were machined from solid aluminum.

These are the front and back vise jaws removed from the vise; they were machined from solid aluminum.